Daily Digest

Brits Lockdown Behaviour Shows Surge In Donations And Online Shopping

Grazielle Moura
by
5684

WordPress database error: [Duplicate entry '8388607' for key 'id']
INSERT INTO `wp_et_bloom_stats` (`record_date`, `optin_id`, `record_type`, `page_id`, `list_id`, `ip_address`, `removed_flag`) VALUES ('2020-10-26 01:47:47', 'optin_0', 'imp', 40753, 'mailchimp_b7c874c605', '162.158.79.154', 0)

Listen to this article now

New research on Brits lockdown behaviour reveals what the British consumers have splashed on since the lockdown began.

Over one third (37%) of Brits head online more often, for retail therapy than before the COVID-19 crisis.

As such, grocery shopping takes the top spot with 40% of shoppers ordering online since lockdown began.

Vast Majority Of Brits Think Buying Non-Essential Items Online Is Acceptable

Vast Majority Of Brits Think Buying Non-Essential Items Online Is Acceptable

Source: YouGov, 20-21 April 2020

The study on Brits lockdown behaviour shows the DIY and home furniture items are ordered by more than a third with 34%, as the country takes the opportunity to give their homes a ‘glow-up’.




Other non-essential items are also seeing a rise in online sales as fashion and beauty items are ordered by 29%. That’s almost one in three shoppers.

Whilst staying at home is essential to help fight the virus and support the NHS, bored Brits are turning to computer games and reading as forms of entertainment.

Tech and gaming items are ordered by 25% – that’s one in four, and books and magazines are ordered by 20% – that’s one in five customers.

Most-Read Articles

Contrastingly a quarter of consumers (25%) are taking the lockdown as an opportunity to save, revealing they are spending less during the pandemic.

Regionally, 39% of Londoners have purchased non-essential products more frequently online during the lockdown.

Whereas less than one third (31%) of those in the Midlands have increased their spending online.




Joel Kempson, a personal finance expert at Money said:

As life under lockdown becomes the new normal for the majority of the UK, it’s interesting to see how shopping and spending habits have changed.

And that’s true. More practical shoppers are seeing COVID-19 as an opportunity to invest in their homes.

Others, buy new items to help fight the boredom of isolation.

Three In Ten Brits Have Bought Fashion And Beauty During The Lockdown

Three In Ten Brits Have Bought Fashion And Beauty During The Lockdown

Source: YouGov, 20-21 April 2020

Three in ten Brits buying clothes or beauty products during COVID-19 lockdown.

The nation is splashing the cash online in a bid to keep busy despite the confines of coronavirus restrictions.

It’s also great to see that almost one in four of those surveyed are taking the opportunity to save money. Having cash in the bank or paying off existing debts can really help reduce money-related worries.

As the heroic frontline workers continue to inspire the nation in their fundraising efforts, data shows that charitable Brits have headed online to do their bit again.

Searches for NHS T-shirts – buy to donate – have been soaring by 3,750% in the last 30 days.




Brits Lockdown Behaviour – Quick Recap

  • 37% of consumers say they are shopping more frequently online than pre-lockdown.
  • Grocery shopping takes the top spot with 40% ordering food online.
  • Stay-at-home Brits give their homes a glow up as over a third (34%) spend on DIY and home furnishing.
  • Fashion and Beauty shopping rises with 29% of shoppers now ordering online and 27% have bought medicine and healthcare products online.
  • A quarter of bored Brits upgrade their tech and gaming kit, while fifth ordered books and magazines to get through the lockdown.
  • One in four say they are taking the opportunity to save during COVID-19 restrictions.

Weekly Newsletter. Sign Up Now!

Celebrities, designers, and latest news in sustainable fashion.

You have Successfully Subscribed!

WTVOX – ‘Voicing the Future of Fashion’

For more similar content and lightning-quick updates delivered directly to your inbox subscribe to our weekly newsletter.

For daily news in sustainable fashion, innovation, conscious beauty and lifestyle follow us on social media: Instagram, LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter.

Finally, if you want to interact with thousands like you, join your tribe on the Future of Fashion Group.

A decade of fashion; here’s to the next one.

The past decade has been turbulent – and defining – for fashion: child labour, climate crisis, gender inequality, animal cruelty, and reckless plastic pollution, just to name a few.

With the COVID-19 pandemic, the beginning of this decade does not look too good either.

That’s why finding media that reports with rigour and integrity at heart is difficult in critical times.

Finding media that informs all, regardless of where they live or if they can afford to pay, is even harder.

In these times, independent fashion media magazines are increasingly silenced by commercial ownership and social media misinformation.

So far, your unceasing support has allowed us to keep delivering trustworthy, relevant, high-quality content.

Your support allowed us to uphold our editorial independence and ensure honest journalism, free from commercial ownership or political bias.

We are deeply grateful for your generosity and continue to count on your support.

Donate from as little as 1p.

Thank you.



Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

  1. Dermoin

    5 May 2020

    How bizarre, why is the grocery shopping top spot with 40 per cent of the shoppers ordering online? Even before the lockdown online shopping was at 50 per cent or even more. So is this in comparison to what?

  2. Areta

    26 May 2020

    Yes, but that over one-third of Brits head online for retail therapy is not that much more than it was before the COVID-19 crisis. Online is the future, pandemic or not.

  3. Thanks for linking to us guys, I’ve linked again to the latest report and updates. Best x

  4. I am sorry but I cannot trust that paid report. I see it is from a commercial website that hasn’t been endorsed by the British Government and most of the data they’ve used to compile their report comes from Daily Mail and Telegraph :))) Come on.

    Here’s the most reliable source, get your facts right:

    https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/department-of-health-and-social-care